Windows Build 10036 Leak From WZor

Windows Live Support

Windows 10 Release

Buffs await the release of Windows 10, while many others are trying to get their hands on whatever new they can find about the latest build. One of the newer leak videos on YouTube shows what is being called version number 10036. Put up on March 12, this video showcases a leak whose supposed screenshots also came up on the Russian blog WZor.net.

The video itself focuses on some of the new features in the new OS, such as the Task View, and the provision to drag-and-drop applications to launch desktops. This is useful for those users who wish to move around more freely between app and desktop milieus.

In another screenshot of the 10036 build, you see a new Wi-Fi selection window. The current builds need you to hit the “Wi-Fi” option inside the Action Center if you want to be making any changes. Version 10036 is able to speed the process up by letting the user make their changes inside a separately opened window.

Another newbie is the half-transparent Start Menu. Apparently, this only changes the look of the thing, and not the usability. But that seems incongruent with the whole Metro feel that Microsoft was supposedly going for; this fits in better with the style that Windows 7 and Vista espoused.

Release Of Windows 10

Windows 10 Leak

There has been no new build announced from Microsoft of late, and people are desperate to get their next peek at what is happening with the product. Since this is in beta, they do not have any hope of Windows live support at this time. From what has known so far, there are apparently two public release channels for Windows 10. The one for regular updates let you access the features sooner, though this is only available to Microsoft testers. The other one, slower updates, lets you enjoy a longer tested and more refined model of the OS. Gabe Aul tweeted this month that the fast channel was looking to speed up sometime soon.

Another thing he said on Windows blog was that the unset date for the release is a good way to keep work going along at its fastest, with teams able to finish their projects in less time than otherwise. The January build apparently was a case in point. “It paid off,” he wrote in a post. “We got a much fresher build out, with more features and fixes, and we were able to ship on 1/23 as we’d aspired.” And of course with less unfixed issues, it would bring down the need for many customers to call up Windows Live support.